For efficient electric vehicle traction inverter design, you need a high-performance smart gate driver!

Different automotive subsystems have different requirements for system performance and functional safety. In traction inverter systems, for example, this trend toward boosting functions can maximize efficiency and reduce BOM costs. The emergence of high-performance smart gate drivers can reduce board area and reduce BOM costs while meeting the needs for improved functionality and performance.

For efficient electric vehicle traction inverter design, you need a high-performance smart gate driver!

In the automotive and e-mobility markets, the electrification of passenger and commercial vehicles has brought about dramatic changes in the development of various subsystems.

First, the development cycle from design concept to product launch for electric vehicle systems is shorter than for “traditional” vehicles. In addition, these relatively “simple” EV systems compared to ICE systems (engine and transmission) increase competition by allowing non-traditional Tier 1 suppliers to enter the automotive ecosystem.

To counter the impact of rising costs and maintain control over intellectual property and bill of materials (BOM), many OEMs are building the capability to design, develop and manufacture subsystems in-house. At the same time, traditional Tier 1 suppliers continue to invest in EV systems while competing with new entrants in an attempt to maintain penetration of OEMs.

To maintain partnerships and provide differentiated services, some Tier 1 suppliers integrate multiple key EV system components, such as inverters, traction motors and transmissions. Both OEMs and new Tier 1 suppliers need to quickly master system analysis and integration capabilities, especially with regard to functional safety requirements. As a result, they increasingly look to semiconductor suppliers to help them bridge this development and knowledge gap.

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Different automotive subsystems have different requirements for system performance and functional safety. In traction inverter systems, for example, this trend toward boosting functions can maximize efficiency and reduce BOM costs. The emergence of high-performance smart gate drivers can reduce board area and reduce BOM costs while meeting the needs for improved functionality and performance.

Gate drivers such as NXP’s GD3100 and GD3160 are intelligent and allow programming to not only protect SiC or IGBT Power devices under harsh operating conditions, but also improve system efficiency and shorten fault detection/reaction times.

For efficient electric vehicle traction inverter design, you need a high-performance smart gate driver!
GD3160 block diagram

Integrated high-voltage (>1,000Vrms) isolation supports digital reporting of information from the high-voltage (400V to 800V) domain to the low-voltage (12V) domain. These parameters include various fault conditions, power device temperature, and VCE or VGE state of the power device. Enhanced monitoring of different parameters contributes to ASIL D functional safety of electric vehicle systems. Gate driver waveform shaping capabilities, such as segment drivers, allow customers to optimize switching to improve efficiency while preventing overshoot to reduce EMC noise.

For more information about GD3160, please click to read the latest product introduction >>

For efficient electric vehicle traction inverter design, you need a high-performance smart gate driver!
Traction Inverter System Block Diagram

NXP is committed to providing system solutions such as traction inverter reference designs, complete inverter evaluation tools, and functional safety documentation to reduce development costs and speed time to market.

For efficient electric vehicle traction inverter design, you need a high-performance smart gate driver!

author of this article

Namrata Pandya is a Product Marketing Manager for High Voltage Gate Drivers at NXP. For the past 15 years, Namrata has worked for ON Semiconductor and Microchip Technology, where he managed business development and product lines for a semiconductor product portfolio valued at over $60 million. She is responsible for driving 16 product lines from concept to launch. Namrata holds a master’s degree in electrical engineering from San Jose State University.

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